Events

May
15
Fri
To the Manor Born : Unpacking the Towner Art Collection by Dr Helen Rufus-Ward & Helena Birch
May 15 @ 2:30 pm

 

DUE TO THE CORONOVIRUS PANDEMIC, WE ARE NOT PROCESSING TICKET REQUESTS FOR THIS EVENT, AT THIS TIME.

IF WE ARE ABLE TO RUN THIS EVENT WE WILL LET YOU KNOW ON THIS PAGE.

 

For nearly a century the Towner Art Gallery has enriched the lives of Eastbourne residents and visitors to the town, turning from a small provincial art gallery into a gallery that champions contemporary art in the 21st century.

This lecture will begin with the gallery’s inception in the 1920s (thanks to the generosity of Alderman John Chisholm Towner) before exploring the development of the Towner Collection.  The main focus of the lecture will be some of Towner’s key art works (some very familiar, others not so) that express the evolution of the gallery’s acquisition policy that has allowed the collection to grow into the respected gallery it is today.  Along the way, the audience will encounter all manner of delights – tranquil landscapes, mysterious and shadowy interiors, controversial abstracts and iconic Eastbourne imagery.  A reminder of the art riches on our doorstep.

Helena Birch is an ex Head of Art and is now a practising artist and a tour guide at Tate Modern under the heading of ‘Making Sense of Modern Art!’  Dr Helen Rufus-Ward is a published art historian, university lecturer and an accredited speaker for the Arts Society.

Picture is Lombardi, Giovanni Battista; The Veiled Lady; Towner;

Jun
12
Fri
The History of Fans and their Language by Janie Ramsey
Jun 12 @ 2:30 pm

DUE TO THE CORONOVIRUS PANDEMIC, WE ARE NOT PROCESSING TICKET REQUESTS FOR THIS EVENT, AT THIS TIME.

IF WE ARE ABLE TO RUN THIS EVENT WE WILL LET YOU KNOW ON THIS PAGE.

 

This illustrated talk traces the history of the fan, with emphasis on the beautiful Georgian and Victorian fans of the 18th and 19th centuries.  This was truly the age of the fan when they were the height of fashion throughout Europe from royalty to parlour maids.

We look at the different materials from which they were made, how they were used and the pitfalls awaiting the unwary user.

And what about the Language of Fans.    Did it exist and if so, how did it work? Can YOU ‘have a conversation?’  Here’s your chance to have a go!

Janie Ramsay started her antique business in Tunbridge Wells in 1975 specialising in pre 1870 furniture, Tunbridge ware, silver, jewellery, 18th century glass, collectibles and fans.  Janie could have over 100 in her shop at any one time!  In 1998 Janie joined Sotheby’s in Bond Street and became a Director in 1998 before retiring in 2008 when she continued working as a consultant until 2014.

Jul
17
Fri
Preserving Wall Paintings: From English Churches to Egyptian Tombs by Stephen Rickerby
Jul 17 @ 2:30 pm

DUE TO THE CORONOVIRUS PANDEMIC, WE ARE NOT PROCESSING TICKET REQUESTS FOR THIS EVENT, AT THIS TIME.

IF WE ARE ABLE TO RUN THIS EVENT WE WILL LET YOU KNOW ON THIS PAGE.

 

From our earliest cultures to the present day, we have decorated the places that we inhabit, in both life and death, with wall paintings. Decorated surfaces are found in all parts of the world, from mountain-top monasteries to remote desert caves. They have been used by rulers to immortalise their authority, by the wealthy to display their opulence, and by the less wealthy to demonstrate social aspiration. Pagan cults and religions have developed imagery for decorating the walls of tombs, churches and temples. The human desire to decorate houses with painting has left glimpses of how people like us lived thousands of years ago. Stephen Rickerby is a conservator who has worked on wall paintings around the world. In this illustrated presentation, he will talk about the challenges of preserving paintings in locations as diverse as English churches, Buddhist caves in China, rock-cut churches in Ethiopia, and Egyptian tombs.

 

Stephen Rickerby Stephen Rickerby received his MA in art history from Aberdeen University before undertaking the Courtauld Institute of Art/Getty Conservation Institute Postgraduate Diploma in the Conservation of Wall Painting (1985-88). He has since worked extensively on wall painting projects in the UK and internationally. He now co runs his own London-based wall conservation practice called Rickerby & Shekede.